Our Take – Why you should wear a face mask

Published on March 2020 

Whilst the World Health Organisation and the Australian Government have been advocating for masks not to be worn by the general public, we believe this to be a measure taken to prevent “toilet paper syndrome” – there’s already a shortage of surgical masks – if everybody bought one there would be even fewer available from front-line medical staff which is a problem. Front-line members of the community should definitely have priority when it comes to surgical/medical grade masks. 

Our initiative is aligned with the American Centre for Disease Control who recently announced it’s recommendation for the general public to wear masks made of fabric (cloth). In our opinion, this makes absolute sense.

Of course masks don’t stop infection, but if used properly the pro’s of wearing a face mask far outweigh the cons. Wearing a face mask will assist with:

  • Avoiding contamination of others through saliva or spitting while talking
  • Reducing contamination via coughing and sneezing (not just for COVID-19)
  • Lessening hand contact with mouth and nose
  • Heightened awareness of COVID-19 amongst staff and customers, encouraging social distancing

As such, we’ve decided to make our design and production process available to everyone who is able to sew. 

 

Materials Needed:

  1. Elastic Material (Long = 14″ (355mm), Short = 10″ (254mm)) – 6mm wide.
  2. Suitable Fabric (should be breathable, recommend a poly-cotton blend which will withstand regular washing). We use a fusible interface fabric between the poly-cotton layers for additional filtration.  Our design includes 3 layers.
  3. Chenille stick (for flexible / adjustable nose bridge) – folded in half 2x

Face Mask Materials

 

Pattern and sizing:

Cut your fabrics (as per the material list above) to size. The mask consists of two sides, each consisting of three layers for filtration. 

face mask patters

 

Assembly Instructional Video

Watch our Guru “Thi” on the sewing machine put the mask together.

The final stage in our mask production involves feeding the masks through a heat tunnel at 160 degrees celsius for 2 minutes.

Wearing a mask takes a little getting used to which we’re not really accustomed to in Australia. Make the effort to wear it each time you leave your house, especially if you’re interacting with other people (shopping etc).

Be sure to REGULARLY wash your hands. Wash your hands before putting on your mask and then again after removing. Avoid touching your mask while on your face.